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Applicability Of Tonnage Measurment Systems To U.S


Subj: CH-2 TO NVIC 11-93, APPLICABILITY OF TONNAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS TO U.S. FLAG VESSELS

  1. Purpose. This Circular revises Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) NO. 11-93, Change 1, to include criteria on substantial alterations and remeasurement, and to reflect clarifications and corrections.

  2. Discussion. The principal differences between this Circular and NVIC 11-93, Change 1 are as follows:

    1. Specific criteria have been included for use in evaluating when a vessel is considered to have been substantially altered and/or requires remeasurement following changes. These criteria were developed after a comprehensive review of domestic and international requirements on tonnage grandfathering and remeasurement. They were initially promulgated by U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Center (MSC) letter, Serial C3-9602956, dated October 21, 1996, in response to an appeal.

    2. Information has been added to clarify how temporary deck equipment (e.g. tanks and trailers) and deck cargo are treated from a measurement standpoint.

    3. Tables 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 have been revised to reflect that simplified measurement system tonnages may have been used to document recreational vessels of lengths 79 feet and over prior to October 12, 1989.

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      NAVIGATION AND VESSEL INSPECTION CIRCULAR NO. 11-93, CH-2

    4. Table 7 has been revised to reflect that regulatory measurement system tonnages may have been used to document vessels of lengths 79 feet and over prior to October 12, 1989.

    5. Tables 9, 10, and 11 have been deleted, and their contents incorporated into Tables 5, 6, and 7, respectively, for consistency with other changes to this NVIC.

  3. Implementation. Replace enclosure (1) of NVIC 11-93, Change 1 with enclosure (1) of this NVIC.

Encl: (1) Enclosure (1) to NVIC 11-93, CH-2

Non-Standard Distribution:

C:e New Orleans (90); Hampton Roads (50); Baltimore (45); San Francisco, Puget Sound (40); Philadelphia, Port Arthur, Honolulu (35); Miami, Houston, Mobile, Long Beach, Morgan City, Portland OR (25); Jacksonville (20); Boston, Portland ME, Charleston, Galveston, Anchorage (15); Cleveland (12); Louisville, Memphis, Paducah, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Savannah, San Juan, Tampa, Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Duluth, Milwaukee, San Diego, Juneau, Valdez (10); Providence, Huntington, Wilmington, Corpus Christi, Toledo, Guam, Sault Ste. Marie (5).

C:m New York (70); Sturgeon Bay (4).

D:d Except Baltimore and Moriches.

D:l CG Liaison Officer MILSEALIFTCOMD (Code N-7CG), CG Liaison Officer RSPA (DHM-22), CG Liaison Officer MARAD (MAR-742), CG Liaison Officer JUSMAGPHIL, CG Liaison Officer World Maritime University, CG Liaison Officer ABS, Maritime Liaison Office Commander U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (1).

NOAA Fleet Inspection Officer (1).
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (1).
Enclosure (1) to NVIC 11-93, CH-2

APPLICABILITY OF TONNAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS TO U.S. FLAG VESSELS

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE USE OF THIS ENCLOSURE

General: This enclosure provides tonnage measurement requirements for U.S. flag vessels. The specific requirements for a given vessel are found in one of the tables of this enclosure. To determine which table applies to a given vessel, use the following instructions:
1ST Evaluate Overall Length - Determine whether or not the overall length of the vessel is less than 24 meters (79 feet). Use the definition of overall length found on page 3. If the overall length is less than 24 meters (79 feet), proceed to step 3.
2ND evaluate convention length - Determine whether or not the convention length of the vessel is less than 24 meters (79 feet). Use the definition of convention length found on page 2.
3RD Determine Propulsion Category - Determine whether the vessel is self-propelled or non-self-propelled.
4TH Determine Voyage Type - Determine the type of voyages the vessel will engage on (i.e., domestic, Great Lakes, or foreign). Use the definitions of the three voyage types found on page 2.
5TH Select Applicable Table From Index - Based on the parameters determined above, and the following additional parameters (as applicable), select the appropriate table from the index on page 5:
Keel Laid/Substantially Altered Date - Use the definitions of pages 3 and 4 to determine this date. In a case where a vessel has been substantially altered, use the date when it was most recently substantially altered as the date for entering the index.
Recreational/Non-Recreational - Use the definition of a recreational vessel found on page 3 to determine whether the vessel is recreational or non-recreational.
6TH Proceed To Applicable Table - Proceed to the table identified in step 5 above for the tonnage measurement system requirements for the subject vessel.
EXAMPLE: As an example of the use of these instructions, consider a steam propelled containership of conventional design with an overall length of 207.0 meters (679.1 feet) that engages on voyages on both the Great Lakes and between ports in the United States and Europe. The vessel's convention length is 196.7 meters (645.3 feet). The vessel's keel was laid in 1972, and the vessel was substantially altered in 1989 (in this case, a deckhouse was added).
1ST Evaluate Overall Length - The overall length is over 24 meters (79 feet).
2ND Evaluate Convention Length - The convention length is over 24 meters (79 feet).
3RD Determine Propulsion Category - The vessel is self-propelled.
4TH Determine Voyage Type - The vessel engages both on Great Lakes voyages and foreign voyages.
5TH Select Applicable Table From Index - Based on overall length over 79 feet, convention length over 79 feet, voyage type of foreign (note that this vessel does not engage on "Great Lakes Voyages Only"), and substantially altered date of 1989, the appropriate table for this vessel is Table 7.
6TH Proceed To Applicable Table - Proceed to Table 7 on page 10 for the tonnage measurement
system requirements for the subject vessel.



DEFINITIONS OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS The following is a list of definitions of terms and acronyms used in this enclosure. These definitions apply only to the material presented in this enclosure.

  1. Cargo Vessel - For the purposes of this enclosure, a cargo vessel is any vessel which carries 12 passengers or less, where a passenger is defined as every person on board the vessel other than:

    1. the master and members of the crew or other persons employed or engaged in any capacity on board the vessel in the business of that vessel; and

    2. a child under one year of age.

    CFR - Code of Federal Regulations.

  2. Convention Measurement System - A U.S. tonnage measurement system that is based on and complies with the requirements of the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969. This system uses total molded volume as its basis. This system is not available for measurement of vessels with overall length less than 24 meters (79 feet). Requirements for measurement under this system are detailed in 46 CFR 69, Subpart B.

  3. Convention Length - Either 96 percent of the length on a waterline at 85% of the least molded depth measured from the top of the flat keel, or the length from the fore side of the stem to the axis of the rudder stock on that waterline, whichever is greater. In vessels designed with a rake of keel, this length is measured on a waterline parallel to the design waterline.

  4. Deck Cargo - For the purposes of this enclosure, deck cargo is defined as freight carried on the weather decks of a vessel for the sole purpose of its transport between two separate and distinct locations, and which is off-loaded from the vessel in its original container (if applicable) without undergoing any processing or other use while onboard the vessel. For example, a JP-5 fuel tank being transported to an offshore platform and hoisted on board the platform with its original contents intact is considered deck cargo. If for the same tank, shipboard pumps are used to off-load the JP-5 to the platform, the tank would not be considered deck cargo. Note that permanency of attachment has nothing to do with whether or not an item is considered as deck cargo: a bona fide shipping container can either be lashed or welded to the deck, provided it meets all the criteria for deck cargo as outlined above.

  5. Domestic Voyage - A voyage that is not a foreign voyage or a Great Lakes voyage. For the purposes of this enclosure, if a vessel engages on both domestic and Great Lakes voyages, the requirements for vessels "engaged on domestic voyages only" apply.

  6. Foreign Voyage - A voyage involving a vessel:

    1. arriving at a place under the jurisdiction of the United States from a place in a foreign country;

    2. making a voyage between places outside of the United States;

    3. departing from a place under the jurisdiction of the United States for a place in a foreign country; or

    4. making a voyage between a place within a territory or possession of the United States and another place under the jurisdiction of the United States not within that territory or possession. For the purposes of this enclosure, a Great Lakes voyage is not a foreign voyage, even if the vessel stops at a port in Canada. In addition, if a vessel engages on both domestic and foreign voyages, the requirements for vessels "engaged on foreign voyages" apply.

  7. Great Lakes Voyage - A voyage on the Great Lakes, where the Great Lakes are defined as the Great Lakes of North America and the St. Lawrence River west of a rhumb line drawn from Cap Des Rosiers to West Point, Anticosti Island, and, on the north side of Anticosti Island, the meridian of longitude 63 degrees west.

  8. Interim Scheme - A set of requirements established by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to provide for the transition from tonnages established under existing national tonnage measurement systems to tonnages established under the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969, for the application of SOLAS, STCW and MARPOL. The provisions of the interim schemes as they apply to U.S. flag vessels are summarized as below:

  9. SOLAS Interim Scheme (IMO Resolution A.494(XII)) - At the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used for the application of the provisions of SOLAS for vessels in the following categories:

    1. all vessels with keel laid/substantially altered from 19 July 1982 to 31 December 1985.

    2. cargo vessels under 1600 gross tons (as measured under the regulatory measurement system) with keel laid/substantially altered from 1 January 1986 to 18 July 1994.

    3. In addition, at the request of the vessel owner, all vessels with keel laid/substantially altered from 19 July 1982 to 18 July 1994 may use regulatory measurement system tonnages for the application of SOLAS radiotelephony station requirements.

    Refer to IMO Resolution A.494(XII) for details.

  10. STCW Interim Scheme (IMO Resolution A.540(13)) - At the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used for the application of the provisions of STCW for vessels in the following categories:

    1. all vessels with keel laid/substantially altered from 19 July 1982 to 31 December 1985.

    2. cargo vessels under 1600 gross tons (as measured under the regulatory measurement system) with keel laid/substantially altered from 1 January 1986 to 18 July 1994.

  11. MARPOL Interim Scheme (IMO Resolution A.541(13)) - At the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used for the application of the provisions of MARPOL for vessels in the following category:

    1. all vessels under 400 gross tons (as measured under the regulatory measurement system) with keel laid/substantially altered from 19 July 1982 to 18 July 1994.

  12. International Tonnage Certificate (1969) - An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) is an internationally recognized document used to certify tonnages and dimensions of vessel flying flags of nations which are party to the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969. The certificate is issued for vessels 79 feet and over in convention length that engage on foreign voyages.

  13. Keel Laid - Refers to the date a vessel's keel was laid or the vessel was at a similar stage of construction.

    Overall Length - The horizontal distance of the hull between the foremost part of the stem and the aftermost part of the stern, excluding fittings and attachments.

  14. Recreational Vessel - A vessel:

    1. being manufactured or operated primarily for pleasure; or

    2. leased, rented or chartered to another for the latter's pleasure.

  15. Regulatory Measurement System - A U.S. tonnage measurement system with a historical basis that requires that all closed-in spaces on a vessel be measured and treated according to their use. Prior to 1983, the regulatory measurement system was the only U.S. tonnage measurement system available. Requirements for measurement under this system are detailed in the following Subparts of 46 CFR 69:

    Subpart C - Standard Measurement (formal system with historical basis)

    Subpart D - Dual Tonnage Measurement (formal system based on standard measurement but allowing assignment of two sets of tonnages)

    Subpart E - Simplified Measurement (informal system using principal dimensions furnished by vessel owner)

  16. Remeasurement - Remeasurement is the process by which a vessel which had been previously assigned tonnages and registered dimensions under the convention and/or regulatory measurement systems must be remeasured and reassigned tonnages and/or dimensions. If required, a new U.S. Tonnage Certificate and/or International Tonnage Certificate (1969) is issued following remeasurement. Criteria for remeasurement are as indicated below.

    1. For vessels assigned tonnages under the convention, standard or dual measurement systems (46 CFR Part 69 Subparts B, C, or D, respectively), remeasurement is required under any of the following circumstances:

      1. The vessel undergoes a change which affects the registered length, registered breadth, or registered depth.

      2. The vessel undergoes a change which results in an increase or decrease by more than 5% in the vessel's gross or net tonnage as determined under the convention measurement system. For the purpose of applying this criteria, the convention measurement system tonnages for a vessel not measured under the convention measurement system may be estimated by adding the exempted tonnage to the regulatory measurement system gross and net tonnages. Also, the convention measurement system tonnages of an identical sister vessel may be used as the basis for applying this criteria.

      3. For vessels assigned tonnages under the convention measurement system, the vessel undergoes a change in the use of its spaces, the number of passengers authorized to be carried aboard the vessel, the assigned load line, or the permitted draft, which results in an increase or decrease by more than 5% in the convention measurement system net tonnage.

      4. The Commanding Officer, U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Center or the vessel owner alleges an error in assigned tonnages or registered dimensions of the vessel.

      This criteria is intended to permit relatively minor changes that affect the assigned tonnages to be made without the need for a vessel to be remeasured. It MAY NOT be used as a mechanism by which owners of vessels measured under the standard or dual measurement systems can improve the efficiencies of their vessels by removing, altering or obstructing features that were incorporated into the vessel's design to reduce tonnages that were determined under the standard or dual measurement systems. Examples include obstruction of tonnage openings, removing portions of ordinary framing with greater web depths than are required for strength purposes, or conversion of passenger spaces or water ballast spaces to cargo spaces. Should such features be altered in the manner described, remeasurement of the vessel under the standard or dual measurement system, as applicable, is required.

    2. For vessels assigned tonnages under the simplified measurement system (46 CFR Part 69 Subpart E), remeasurement is required under any of the following circumstances:

      1. The vessel undergoes a change which affects the registered length, registered breadth, or registered depth.

      2. The vessel undergoes a change which results in an increase or decrease by more than 5% in the vessel's gross or net tonnage as determined under simplified measurement.

      3. The Commanding Officer, U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Center or the vessel owner alleges an error in assigned tonnages or registered dimensions of the vessel.

  17. Substantially Altered - Refers to the date a substantial alteration on a vessel was commenced. A vessel is considered to have been substantially altered if it undergoes alterations or modifications which result in an increase or decrease of more than 5% in either the regulatory measurement system gross tonnage (if assigned) or the convention measurement system gross tonnage (whether assigned or not). For the purposes of this enclosure, there is no difference between a vessel for which the keel was laid on a particular date and a vessel that was substantially altered on that same date. In most cases, addition or removal of temporary deck equipment does not involve "alterations or modifications" to a vessel, and therefore would have no bearing on whether or not a vessel has been substantially altered.

  18. Temporary Deck Equipment - Temporary deck equipment is defined as any enclosed space of a semi-permanent nature located on the weather decks of a vessel and which cannot be considered as deck cargo.

    Examples of temporary deck equipment include processing tanks, seismic trailers, and housed portable machinery. If the appropriate tonnage certificate includes an allowance for temporary deck equipment, such equipment can be removed or added without the necessity to remeasure the vessel provided the maximum allowed equipment volume specified on the tonnage certificate is not exceeded. Note that unhoused portable machinery is not included in tonnage.

  19. U.S. Laws. - Laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305, which include laws addressing requirements for manning, licensing, navigation safety, and vessel inspection.

  20. U.S. Tonnage Certificate - A U.S. Tonnage Certificate (formerly a Certificate of Admeasurement) is a document used to certify tonnages and registered dimensions assigned to a U.S. flag vessel.

    It is highly recommended, though not required, that a copy of the U.S. Tonnage Certificate be carried on board the vessel at all times. Vessels measured under Subpart E of the regulatory measurement system are not issued a U.S. Tonnage Certificate.

    For documented vessels, the Subpart E tonnages are calculated by the Coast Guard and appear on the Certificate of Documentation.



INDEX OF TONNAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

Overall Length

24 meters (79 feet) and over and:

Overall Lengthless than

24 meters (79 ft)

Convention Length less than

24 meters (79 feet)

Convention Length

24 meters (79 feet)

and over

SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS

* Engaged on Domestic

Voyages Only with

Keel Laid/Substantially Altered:

* Before 1 January 1986

Table 1

Table 2

Table 2

* 1 January 1986 and After

Table 1

Table 3

Table 3

* Engaged on Great Lakes Voyages Only

* Recreational Vessels

Table 1

Table 4

Table 4

* Non-Recreational Vessels

Table 1

Table 2

Table 2

* Engaged on Foreign Voyages with

Keel Lain/Substantially Altered:

* Before 18 July 1982

Table 1

Table 2

Table 5

* 18 July 1982 - 31 December 1985

Table 1

Table 2

Table 6

* 1 January 1986 - 18 July 1994

Table 1 (p.6)

Table 3

Table 7

* 19 July 1994 and After

Table 1

Table 3

Table 8

NON-SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS

* Engaged on Domestic Voyages Only

Table 1

Table 4

Table 4

* Engaged on Great Lakes Voyages Only

Table 1

Table 4

Table 4

* Engaged on Foreign Voyages with

Keel Laid/Substantially Altered

* Before 18 July 1982

Table 1

Table 4

Table 5

* 18 July 1982 - 31 December 1985

Table 1

Table 4

Table 6

* 1 January 1986 - 18 July 1994

Table 1

Table 4

Table 7

* 19 July 1994 and After

Table 1

Table 4

Table 8



TABLES OF TONNAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

FOR U. S. FLAG VESSELS

TABLE 1


Item Requirement
Available Measurement
Systems
Regulatory (Subpart C, D, or E)
Documentation Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel.
U.S. Laws Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply U.S. laws
listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
Not applicable.
International Conventions Not applicable for vessels engaged on domestic voyages only. For vessels engaged on Great Lakes or foreign voyages, regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all International Conventions.
SOLAS Interim Scheme Not applicable.
STCW Interim Scheme Not applicable.
MARPOL Interim Scheme Not applicable.

TABLE 2


Item Requirement
Available Measurement Systems Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C or D for all vessels); Regulatory (Subpart E for recreational vessels documented before 12 October 1989 using simplified measurement system tonnages and not subsequently remeasured).
Documentation

Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, and the vessel may subsequently be redocumented only using convention measurement system tonnages.
U.S. Laws Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305,unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
Not applicable.
International Conventions Not applicable for vessels engaged on domestic voyages only. For vessels engaged on Great Lakes or foreign voyages, the same tonnages used to document the vessel are also used to apply all International Conventions.
SOLAS Interim Scheme Not applicable.
STCW Interim Scheme Not applicable.
MARPOL Interim Scheme Not applicable.

TABLE 3


Item Requirement
Available Measurement Systems Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C or D for all vessels); Regulatory (Subpart E for recreational vessels documented before 12 October 1989 using simplified measurement system tonnages and not subsequently remeasured).
Documentation Convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, with the exception of a vessel documented before 12 October 1989 using regulatory measurement system tonnages. Such a vessel may continue to be documented using regulatory measurement system tonnages until such a time that it must be remeasured for any reason. At that time, the vessel must be documented using convention measurement system tonnages.
U.S. Laws Convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C.14305, unless the vessel owner requests that regulatory measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
Not applicable.
International Conventions Not applicable for vessels engaged on domestic voyages only. For vessels engaged on foreign voyages, the same tonnages used to document the vessel are also used to apply all International Conventions.
SOLAS Interim Scheme Not applicable.
STCW Interim Scheme Not applicable.
MARPOL Interim Scheme Not applicable.

TABLE 4

Item Requirement
Available Measurement
Systems
Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C, D or E).
Documentation Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, unless the vessel
owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, and the vessel may subsequently be redocumented only using convention measurement system tonnages.
U.S. Laws Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305, unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
Not applicable.
International Conventions Not applicable for vessels engaged on domestic voyages only. For vessels engaged on Great Lakes or foreign voyages, the same tonnages used to document the vessel are also used to apply all International Conventions.
SOLAS Interim Scheme Not applicable.
TCW Interim SchemeS Not applicable.
MARPOL Interim Scheme Not applicable.

TABLE 5

Item Requirement
Available Measurement
Systems
Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C or D for all vessels); Regulatory (Subpart E for recreational vessels documented before 12 October 1989 using simplified measurement system tonnages and not subsequently remeasured, unless remeasured only for the purpose of being issued an International Tonnage Certificate (1969).
Documentation Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, and the vessel may subsequently be redocumented only using convention measurement system tonnages.
U.S. Laws Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305, unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S.laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) is required, and must be maintained on board the vessel when it is engaged on a foreign voyage.
International Conventions Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply International Conventions, including SOLAS (self-propelled vessels only), STCW (self-propelled vessels only) and MARPOL, unless: 1) the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose; or 2) the vessel underwent alterations or modifications subsequent to 18 July 1994 that resulted in a change of more than 1% in either the regulatory measurement system gross tonnage ( if assigned) or the convention measurement system gross tonnage. In either event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply International Conventions.
SOLAS Interim Scheme Not applicable.
STCW Interim Scheme Not applicable.
MARPOL Interim Scheme Not applicable.

TABLE 6

Item Requirement
Available Measurement Systems Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C or D for all vessels); Regulatory (Subpart E for recreational vessels documented before 12 October 1989 using simplified measurement system tonnages and not subsequently remeasured, unless remeasured only for the purposes of being issued an International Tonnage Certificate (1969).
Documentation Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, and the vessel may subsequently be redocumentedonly using convention measurement system tonnages.
U.S. Laws Regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305, unless the vessel owner requests that convention measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) is required, and must be maintained on board the vessel when it is engaged on a foreign voyage.
International Conventions Convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply International Conventions, including SOLAS (self-propelled vessels only), STCW (self-propelled vessels only) and MARPOL, unless otherwise allowed by an Interim Scheme.
SOLAS Interim Scheme The Interim Scheme applies to self-propelled vessels only: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of all SOLAS requirements.
STCW Interim Scheme The Interim Scheme applies to self-propelled vessel only: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of all STCW requirements.
MARPOL Interim Scheme The Interim Scheme applies only to vessels with regulatory measurement system tonnages less than 400 gross tons: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of all MARPOL requirements for a vessel in this size category.

TABLE 7


Item Requirement
Available Measurement
Systems
Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C or D for all vessels); Regulatory (Subpart E for recreational vessels documented before 12 October 1989 using simplified measurement system tonnages and not subsequently remeasured, unless remeasured only for the purposes of being issued an International Tonnage Certificate (1969).
Documentation Convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel, with the exception of a vessel documented before 12 October 1989 using regulatory measurement system tonnages. Such vessel may continue to be documented using regulatory measurement system tonnages until such a time that it must be remeasured for any reason. At that time, the vessel must be documented using convention measurement system tonnages.
U.S. Laws Convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305, unless the vessel owner requests that regulatory measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S.laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) is required, and must be maintained on board the vessel when it is engaged on a foreign voyage.
International Conventions Convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply International Conventions, including SOLAS (self-propelled vessels only), STCW (self-propelled vessels only) and MARPOL, unless otherwise allowed by an Interim Scheme.
SOLAS Interim Scheme
(all provisions of SOLAS

except Radiotelephony
Station Requirements)
The Interim Scheme applies only to self-propelled cargo vessels with regulatory measurement system tonnages less than 1600 gross tons: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of all SOLAS requirements for a cargo vessel in this size category.
SOLAS Interim Scheme
(Radiotelephony Station
Requirements only)
The Interim Scheme applies to self-propelled vessels only: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of SOLAS radiotelephony station requirements.
STCW Interim Scheme The Interim Scheme applies only to self-propelled cargo vessels with regulatory measurement system tonnages less than 1600 gross tons: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of all STCW requirements for a cargo vessel in this size category.
MARPOL Interim Scheme The Interim Scheme applies only to vessels with regulatory measurement system tonnages less than 400 gross tons: at the request of the vessel owner, regulatory measurement system tonnages may be used in lieu of convention measurement system tonnages for the application of all MARPOL requirements for a vessel in this size category.

TABLE 8

Item Requirement
Available Measurement
Systems
Convention (Subpart B); Regulatory (Subpart C or D)
Documentation Convention measurement system tonnages are used to document the vessel.
U.S. Laws Convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305, unless the vessel owner requests that regulatory measurement system tonnages be used for this purpose. In this event, regulatory measurement system tonnages are used to apply all U.S. laws listed under 46 U.S.C. 14305.
International Tonnage
Certificate
An International Tonnage Certificate (1969) is required, and must be maintained on board the vessel when it is engaged on a foreign voyage.
International
Conventions
Convention measurement system tonnages are used to apply International Conventions.
SOLAS Interim Scheme Not applicable.
STCW Interim Scheme Not applicable.
MARPOL Interim Scheme Not applicable.

Subj: CH-2 TO NVIC 11-93, APPLICABILITY OF TONNAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS TO U.S. FLAG VESSELS

  1. Purpose. This Circular revises Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) NO. 11-93, Change 1, to include criteria on substantial alterations and remeasurement, and to reflect clarifications and corrections.

  2. Discussion. The principal differences between this Circular and NVIC 11-93, Change 1 are as follows:

    1. Specific criteria have been included for use in evaluating when a vessel is considered to have been substantially altered and/or requires remeasurement following changes. These criteria were developed after a comprehensive review of domestic and international requirements on tonnage grandfathering and remeasurement. They were initially promulgated by U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Center (MSC) letter, Serial C3-9602956, dated October 21, 1996, in response to an appeal.

    2. Information has been added to clarify how temporary deck equipment (e.g. tanks and trailers) and deck cargo are treated from a measurement standpoint.

    3. Tables 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 have been revised to reflect that simplified measurement system tonnages may have been used to document recreational vessels of lengths 79 feet and over prior to October 12, 1989.

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      NAVIGATION AND VESSEL INSPECTION CIRCULAR NO. 11-93, CH-2

    4. Table 7 has been revised to reflect that regulatory measurement system tonnages may have been used to document vessels of lengths 79 feet and over prior to October 12, 1989.

    5. Tables 9, 10, and 11 have been deleted, and their contents incorporated into Tables 5, 6, and 7, respectively, for consistency with other changes to this NVIC.

  3. Implementation. Replace enclosure (1) of NVIC 11-93, Change 1 with enclosure (1) of this NVIC.

Encl: (1) Enclosure (1) to NVIC 11-93, CH-2

Non-Standard Distribution:

C:e New Orleans (90); Hampton Roads (50); Baltimore (45); San Francisco, Puget Sound (40); Philadelphia, Port Arthur, Honolulu (35); Miami, Houston, Mobile, Long Beach, Morgan City, Portland OR (25); Jacksonville (20); Boston, Portland ME, Charleston, Galveston, Anchorage (15); Cleveland (12); Louisville, Memphis, Paducah, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Savannah, San Juan, Tampa, Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Duluth, Milwaukee, San Diego, Juneau, Valdez (10); Providence, Huntington, Wilmington, Corpus Christi, Toledo, Guam, Sault Ste. Marie (5).

C:m New York (70); Sturgeon Bay (4).

D:d Except Baltimore and Moriches.

D:l CG Liaison Officer MILSEALIFTCOMD (Code N-7CG), CG Liaison Officer RSPA (DHM-22), CG Liaison Officer MARAD (MAR-742), CG Liaison Officer JUSMAGPHIL, CG Liaison Officer World Maritime University, CG Liaison Officer ABS, Maritime Liaison Office Commander U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (1).

NOAA Fleet Inspection Officer (1).
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (1).
Enclosure (1) to NVIC 11-93, CH-2

APPLICABILITY OF TONNAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS TO U.S. FLAG VESSELS

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE USE OF THIS ENCLOSURE

General: This enclosure provides tonnage measurement requirements for U.S. flag vessels. The specific requirements for a given vessel are found in one of the tables of this enclosure. To determine which table applies to a given vessel, use the following instructions:
1ST Evaluate Overall Length - Determine whether or not the overall length of the vessel is less than 24 meters (79 feet). Use the definition of overall length found on page 3. If the overall length is less than 24 meters (79 feet), proceed to step 3.
2ND evaluate convention length - Determine whether or not the convention length of the vessel is less than 24 meters (79 feet). Use the definition of convention length found on page 2.
3RD Determine Propulsion Category - Determine whether the vessel is self-propelled or non-self-propelled.
4TH Determine Voyage Type - Determine the type of voyages the vessel will engage on (i.e., domestic, Great Lakes, or foreign). Use the definitions of the three voyage types found on page 2.
5TH Select Applicable Table From Index - Based on the parameters determined above, and the following additional parameters (as applicable), select the appropriate table from the index on page 5:
Keel Laid/Substantially Altered Date - Use the definitions of pages 3 and 4 to determine this date. In a case where a vessel has been substantially altered, use the date when it was most recently substantially altered as the date for entering the index.
Recreational/Non-Recreational - Use the definition of a recreational vessel found on page 3 to determine whether the vessel is recreational or non-recreational.
6TH Proceed To Applicable Table - Proceed to the table identified in step 5 above for the tonnage measurement system requirements for the subject vessel.
EXAMPLE: As an example of the use of these instructions, consider a steam propelled containership of conventional design with an overall length of 207.0 meters (679.1 feet) that engages on voyages on both the Great Lakes and between ports in the United States and Europe. The vessel's convention length is 196.7 meters (645.3 feet). The vessel's keel was laid in 1972, and the vessel was substantially altered in 1989 (in this case, a deckhouse was added).
1ST Evaluate Overall Length - The overall length is over 24 meters (79 feet).
2ND Evaluate Convention Length - The convention length is over 24 meters (79 feet).
3RD Determine Propulsion Category - The vessel is self-propelled.
4TH Determine Voyage Type - The vessel engages both on Great Lakes voyages and foreign voyages.
5TH Select Applicable Table From Index - Based on overall length over 79 feet, convention length over 79 feet, voyage type of foreign (note that this vessel does not engage on "Great Lakes Voyages Only"), and substantially altered date of 1989, the appropriate table for this vessel is Table 7.
6TH Proceed To Applicable Table - Proceed to Table 7 on page 10 for the tonnage measurement
system requirements for the subject vessel.



DEFINITIONS OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS The following is a list of definitions of terms and acronyms used in this enclosure. These definitions apply only to the material presented in this enclosure.

  1. Cargo Vessel - For the purposes of this enclosure, a cargo vessel is any vessel which carries 12 passengers or less, where a passenger is defined as every person on board the vessel other than:

    1. the master and members of the crew or other persons employed or engaged in any capacity on board the vessel in the business of that vessel; and

    2. a child under one year of age.

    CFR - Code of Federal Regulations.

  2. Convention Measurement System - A U.S. tonnage measurement system that is based on and complies with the requirements of the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969. This system uses total molded volume as its basis. This system is not available for measurement of vessels with overall length less than 24 meters (79 feet). Requirements
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